Resources

How to Find a Massage Therapist

Resources

Consumers’ expectations vary when seeking massage treatments. Some people receive massage therapy for medical reasons, such as for rehabilitation after sprains. Some other people receive massage for relaxation or occasional “pampering.” Many others are seeking a combination of the two. It is important to choose the right massage therapist and practice environment for your needs and desires.

The massage industry in Canada and the U.S. is mixed, containing both licensed and unlicensed therapists with a wide variety of training backgrounds and qualifications. Canadian massage licensing is very different from licensing in the U.S. Currently, Ontario and Newfoundland-Labrador require 2,200 hours of training, while British Columbia requires 3,000 hours of training (most states in the U.S. require only about 500 hours of training; New York, which requires 1,000 hours, has the most stringent licensing requirements in the U.S.). Whether you are seeking massage for therapeutic or relaxation purposes, it is essential that you receive proper care from licensed providers. In Ontario, this means seeking care from a registered massage therapist (RMT).

In Ontario, massage therapy is regulated under the Regulated Health Professions Act. Only members of the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario are permitted to use the title Massage Therapist or Registered Massage Therapist, or the designation of RMT.

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5 Responses to Resources

  1. Royal Care Mobile Spa says:

    I’ll immediately snatch your rss feed as I can’t find your e-mail subscription link or newsletter service. Do you’ve any? Kindly allow me understand in order that I may just subscribe. Thanks.

  2. Jangee says:

    First of all, your sister needs to take a step back and bretahe! As a certified massage therapist (and state certified massage instructor) I can assure you that this is a legitimate career.I’ve worked in this field, happily, full time since 1999. Part of that time I carried my household financially (until I married a great guy in 2004). Living in Southern California, owning my own home, I can assure you, the money is there WITHOUT crossing any lines of professional behavior.If you have good training this career is easy on your body despite what someone else indicated. Body mechanics are the key to avoiding problems with your own body.Some of the benefits of this career include the ability to work for yourself if you prefer, set your own hours, and work only a few hours a day for excellent money.One of my recent students is 21 and has a 14 month old son. She completed her basic studies (including anatomy and physiology which are not really that hard) and she is just finishing up her intern hours now. She has a few elective courses to complete and then she’ll be certified.She’s already been offered more than one job whens he certifies including one starting at $55 an hour. Believe it or not, for private clients that’s a little low.Yes, day spas, chiropractors, physical therapists and gyms give you the smallest cut of the pie (so to speak) but if you find good ones, they’ll allow you to build a private clientele also which is where the real money and flexibility comes in.I work part time for 2 chiropractors one of them I come in 2 afternoons a week for only about 2 hours at a time. The other I’m only there one afternoon every other week because this is what has worked for me. We’ll be trying something new in 2007 and I’ll be there one morning a week for 4 hours.Those jobs are low paying’ in the field I only make $30 an hour. I’ve worked at day spas for that price also, but currently don’t have the time.My private appointments take up many evenings. I choose to take off Friday afternoon until Sunday morning as my weekend and I take Tuesday off usually. My private clientele pays anywhere from $70 $120 an hour depending on the location (my location or commuting to them) and depending on modality Swedish, Deep Tissue, Shiatsu, Aromatherapy etc.You work your hours around your child and child care situation. You are paid by private clients at the time of each session so there’s a lot of cash flow in the business. Admittedly spas and the like usually pay twice a month.Many clients give tips even at spas and medical offices so again, it helps with the cash flow if money is tight. My 21 year old student uses her tips to pay for the gas to get where she’s got to be (currently at the school clinic), so she’s not usually out anything even tho each school requires their students to participate in a clinic for practical experience.I hope this information is helpful to you. Don’t hestitate to contact me if you have more questions.

    • Erialc says:

      It depends on how much triniang your state requires and how much triniang you want to pay for. The average is about 500 hours of triniang a few states require 1000 hours. Most schools offer more than the basic required amount so that you can apply for pell grants and other financial aid. The massage profession is a a very big crossroads right now with lots of changes going on. If I were going to massage school now I would take the 3-4 year programs in Canada or find one in the US which I am not even sure if they exist. The reason being is that massage is becoming more medically accepted. It also take a lot to start your own business so the more business and marketing and ethics you can get under your belt the better your chances of success.

      • Sait says:

        well I am in canada and our remqtreuenis are different then in the states (not sure where your writing from) but in canada you need to have a 2200 hour course in the states I think its only 500 hours. I went to a private college and it was 2 years long. It didn’t involve any math, but did involve physiology, Pathology but not really any pharmacology (otehr then learning about certain medications and if they are contraindicated for massage). It requires a lot of studying and dediction defnitly it is hard in that sense but if you keep up on yoru studies and review your information daily then you should be okay, really depends on how you learn and retain information. It is just really demanding, fast paced, you learn a lot in a short time I guess. It you be better if you stated where you were planning on taking it like what country for starters cause even in canada certain provinces are legislated which means at the end you have a big huge provinical exam to do. Goodluck.

  3. Natalya says:

    Really liked what you had to say in your post, Massage Resources – Training, Education, Find Therapists |, thanks for the good read!
    — Natalya

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